Interview with surreal artist Ronch

"The main feature of my work, surrealist, is the meticulous attention to detail in microcosms crowded and dense with situations, through a miniaturist approach, supported by the use of a magnifying glass to define every square inch of the work. Urban contexts are dismembered in a dream-like swarm of architecture, forms and social relations disrupted, provocatively juxtaposed with no apparent order.
Childhood memories and paranoid nightmares are recomposed with graphite or color on canvas and paper, often through pareidolia, returning a duel between the freedom of the absurd and arbitrariness of the rule. The masters that have most influence on my work ranging from Leonardo to Bosch, Brueghel, Dali, Ernst, to its most recent Arrivabene and Di Piazza". - Ronch
 

Hello dear Ronch, please, tell us how did you find the artist inside you? How long have you been doing art? Is art something that you always wanted to do?

I found him one day, when I was a child. I remember that I cried, and soon after I started to laugh: since then I've never stopped, and I've never thought about stopping.

What was / is your major influences? Other artists, books, movies, music or any other media....What inspires you to create your artworks?

Everything inspires me, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Everything related to light, perspective, color, texture, humanity, inhumanity, etc. In terms of characters, the first one was probably the "elusive Wallis". I love basically any kind of art (with the exception of the current reinterpretations of the '60s and '70s); I like the Korn, Neffa, the Queen, the crazy Antonello, Dylan dog and animations.
 

How does "a normal day of artist" in your life look like?
 
Natural alarm "when it comes, it comes"; afternoon spent hanging around between drawings and digital staff; evening devoted to culinary experimentation; night time focused on painting, including self-gift (chocolate/biscuits) in case I manage to reach the sunrise. 

What’s your background? Are you self-taught artist or did you study art? Do you think an art education is important or imperitive for anybody wishing to be an artist? What are some of the advantages and disadvantages that you have encountered throughout your career with/without the formal training of the Art Academy?
 
I attended the artistic lyceum and then I graduated in Fine Arts at the Academy of Brera.
I think that it can be an advantage, but it's probably not something "compulsory" for everybody. "We are dwarves on giants' shoulders", and for this reason we can see far away: attending art schools helps us know many giants and understand which of them are the right ones to climb.
 

What fascinates you the most about surrealism ? How would you describe your style? What themes do you pursue, what surrealism mean to you and what do you hope the viewer will take away from your art?

I love magic. My style? Realistic. I love metaphors and anagrams. I like playing around the re-interpretation of meanings, shapes, social dynamics. I would like people to get lost inside my microcosms and play with them.

What do you love most about creating and being an artist? What does “being creative” mean to you?
 
I like imagining things. Being creative means to me giving birth to new meanings, new worlds and show others how to do the same.
 
 
Can you describe your typical workflow when you’re working on your art? What are your tools of trade? What medium do you most often use and why?

0) Phase zero: sketchbook
1) As a first step, I prepare the canvas/board with chalk and sandpaper in order to make it smooth.
2) Then I draw and I cover the drawing with acrylic
3) Next step, the underpainting
4)  At this point I add the colors
5) I then define everything with lights and shadows
7) At the end, brilliant gloss varnish
 
My main tools are acrylics and canvas boards: they are cheap, manageable and they require different spaces compared to other techniques.

Which creative medium would you love to pursue but haven’t yet?
 
I would like to paint on the clouds.
 

Tell us more about your workspace. What was the most funny or weird thing that happened to you in your studio? What is / was the most strange thing hidding in your studio?
 
This is not to foster any tale around "crazy painters", but I believe that it is a good practice for a painter to make his/her own studio a place where funny and bizarre things happen. A place populated by a range of objects, models, "curiosa". I am having a look around right now: I catch the glimpse of a little springy monkey placed on an ambulance, running away from an elephant "riding" a red Peugeot 206, both observed closely by a t-rex and a plastic goat gathered together in a friendly way.
 
What toughest challenges have you faced as an artist during your art career? What is the biggest lesson you have learned so far?

Well, I don't know… The point is that I do remember everything and nothing at the same time: I just keep the good things.
 
What’s the best and worst advice you ever received in your art career?
 
Best Advice: to be patient
Worst Advice: find a "real job"
 
 
What do you dislike about the art world? What is the hardest thing on being an artist? Is the artistic life lonely? What do you do to counteract it?
 
The System, the hypocrisy, in general the dark side of the force.
The hardest thing could be the financial precariousness.
I think is more isolated than lonely, and you don't have necessary to counteract anything

Where do you see yourself in the future? Professionally, what’s your goal?
 
I have no clue. My next goal will be to learn how to properly paint birds. I thought about fishes as the next step, or fruits and vegetables. Then, after some time, the Venice Biennial, for example.
 
Your favorite art or life quote is ...

I like Dalì's thought, than more or less says "the artist is not an inspired person, but an inspiring one".
 
 
Do you have any tips or inspiring words for others? Maybe advice for beginning artists out there?
 
First we should learn to observe, then to draw, after this we can paint everything.

What are you doing when you’re not creating? What (other) hobbies do you have?

Many things. I think there's always an element of pictorial research in everything I do. I like video games,  cooking, playing with dogs.
 
Do you have an online portfolio, blog or social medias where we can view your work?
 
 
Is there anything else you’d like to say? Is there any project you are working on right now or any ongoing event or exhibition you would like to share with our readers?

Currently I've been studying the light. Let's say that once you've seen the light it is difficult to turn back. Therefore at present I am following the light - even if in the movies they always say you shouldn't do it.
 
 
Thank you dear Ronch, it was a honor to interview you, I wish you only the best for you and your art and already looking forward to see your new art works :)
 
Find Oh, So Surreal on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+ or RSS.